Bersted Park Art Trail

3km (1.8 miles) Circular route

After reading Sarah Davey’s feature last month about staying at home and discovering local areas i thought it would be a great idea to feature a local walk that is accessible to all. So this month a 3km (1.8 mile) trek takes in all the wooden sculptures at Bersted Park that have been created by local chainsaw artist Simon Groves. Bersted Park is the new housing development in North Bersted and is bordered by the redirected A259, within the 26 hectare site are large areas that cannot be built on and now feature the art trail along with a trim trail, lake, sports pitches and a community centre. Arun District council are managing this area in an environmentally friendly way with fields of wild flowers. Over a two year project Berkeley Homes have funded a total of 10+ sculptures as part of their conditions for this new development. Local residents were consulted for ideas on what the sculptures should be and each piece has been expertly carved out of locally sourced sustainable oak. A trail map can be found on the Arun District Council’s website which can be printed off and shows three routes of varying lengths.

The walk starts at the Bersted Park Community Centre and to the right of the building at the edge of the car park can be found the first sculpture featuring a ‘Trail Guide’ showing the three routes. The route featured in this article is the full route marked in yellow. Follow the trail into the fields towards the second sculpture which is a tractor and bales of hay, great for children who can sit on this and imagine that they are farming the fields.

Keeping to the edge of the field continue to the lake, this small body of water has been strategically created as flood relief to this low lying area. It is connected to a number of streams and drainage ditches and ultimately links up with the Aldingbourne Rife. At the end of the lake is a carved wooden sofa where you can sit and take in the native wetland habitat, Yellow Flag Iris can be seen along the edge amongst many wild flowers and the rare water vole may even be seen. In the middle of the lake is an island that features an egrets sculpture, the white of the birds can just be seen above the bushes.

The route goes round the lake and along the southern edge of the park to the trim trail, made up of various outdoor exercise apparatus this is great for those who want to further workout and burn a few extra calories.  At this point a rest can be had on the dragonfly bench and whilst sitting here the orchid sculpture can be seen a little further on.

Double back and follow Barton’s lane to the entrance of the sports field where a great sculpture depicting a football boot and cricket stumps stands. From here the walk continues outside of the sports field, however an eleventh sculpture can be found on this field which is well worth taking a detour to, as the artwork is really amazing.

At this point in the trail swifts can be seen circling around, some great views of the South Downs can be had and a group of three grazing sheep can be seen strategically placed in the middle of the meadow.

Just past here is the WW2 Pill Box, one of thousands that were built along the south coast in 1940 which would have been manned by the home guard to hamper any enemy invasion.

At the far corner of Bersted Park can be seen the waymarker pointing to key areas like Eastfield conservation area and Bersted Brooks that are also worth further exploring if you want to extend the walk.

Follow the sign’s direction and head back to the community centre where the last sculpture called historic piece can be seen on the trail. A great walk for all the family to enjoy.

Highdown Hill Hike


A circular trek of 5km (3.1 Miles) rising up 81m (266 ft) to the top of Highdown Hill which on a clear day will give some amazing views across Worthing to Beachy Head in the East and the Isle of Wight in the West. The walk starts in the car park at the base of the hill however a shorter route can be taken by parking at the higher car park approximately half way to the top.

Over the road from the car park and behind the hedge is the footpath that ascends Highdown, it follows the edge of an arable field and leads firstly to the upper car park at 43m high. With the entrance on the left a visit could be made to ‘Highdown Gardens’, these were once the grounds of the nearby hotel. The gardens started their creation in 1909 in one of the many disused chalk pits by Sir Frederick Stern and his wife, owner then of the Highdown Hotel, He developed the site until his death in 1967. In 1970 the gardens were passed to Worthing Borough Council who since the mid 1970s have restored them to Sterns’ original design.

From the gardens head on upwards until reaching an unmissable burial chamber known as the ‘Millers Tomb’. So called after the miller ‘John Olliver’, who In the 18th century had this tomb built 27 yrs before he actually died in 1793. Many claim that he was the leader of local smugglers and used the tomb to store contraband. He would arrange the sails of his windmill at varying angles to indicate the absence of customs men to his fellow smugglers out at sea. The mill is said to have been damaged in a storm and since demolished, however the brick base of the mill can be seen as a mound at the south west corner of the hill fort.

Take the downward path a short way, then follow westwards along the lower part of the hill, the path passes many disused chalk pits and gives some great views across Worthing. The Highdown vineyard can be seen nestled on the lower south slopes, with great soil and plenty of sun, this working vineyard produces both still and sparkling English Wines. Further along can be seen the Roundstone Farm that got its name from an incident with a runaway millstone rolling down the hill following an accident.

Just past the large chalky escarpment, the path continues west and is then shielded from the hill behind a hedge, giving refuge to many birds. Before long Ecclesden Mill comes into view and is situated just above Ecclesden Manor. This brick tower mill is said to have been built shortly after the demise of John Olliver’s mill in 1826, Milling ceased at Ecclesden Mill in 1872 and the sails were blown off in a storm in 1880. It has since been renovated and is now a private residence.

Walk northwards past the mill and then head up the hill on the well worn track to the top at 81m. The Bronze age saw the first settlers and a hill fort was constructed in the early iron age. Later on, this site also became an Anglo-Saxon cemetery and a number of unusual glass objects can now be seen in Worthing Museum. In more modern times the ancient archaeology of the site has been considerable damaged by a radar station that was built During World War II and many uprooted trees following the Great Storm of 1987.

On heading back down the hill, take a break in the Highdown Hotel built in 1820 as the family home of the Lyons family. In 1909 the house and surrounding grounds were bought by Major Stern and his wife, who’s surname was used as the name of a night club in the 80’s. A short descent from here leads back to the car park at the start.

Windmills, Romans and the Folly

A 9km (5.6 miles) circular walk starting in Eartham. 

When i walked this route it was mainly in the darkness, such that i could get a different perspective of the sights & sounds of this area along with great night time views from Nore Hill.  However i recommend that the walk is carried out in daylight which will show case the beauty of this area much more.

Park up in the village of Eartham and take the road south towards the church. The gates to Eartham House are on the left which was constructed by Thomas Hayley in 1743, albeit much smaller than it is today. Following Thomas’ death the house became home to his son and poet William Hayley who lived in the house from 1774 to 1800. The grade 2 listed house has been extensively enlarged and rebuilt over the years and is now occupied by Great Ballard School.

Head down the footpath opposite the church that passes the the graveyard, continue down the hill and across the fields, shortly the path will start to ascend Long Down, which is the site of some Bronze Age Flint Mines, now a scheduled monument the only trace that can be seen is the knolls of uneven ground when looking south of the path, apparently there are at least fifty infilled shafts and many of the shafts are now under the cultivated fields having been levelled by the ploughing. 

Continuing upwards, Halnaker Windmill soon comes into view and can be seen straight ahead, at dusk it prominently stands as a dark silhouette against the setting sun behind it. A windmill has been on this site since 1540 and the current mill dates from the 1740s. The tower mill was built for the Duke of Richmond to service the Goodwood Estate and was working up until 1905 when it was struck by lightning. The mill has been subject of a Hillaire Beloc poem called Ha’nacker Mill.

The path soon meets the A285 which is part of ‘Stane Street’ turn right and head towards Londinium, this long straight path was once an important roman road linking London Bridge to the harbour at Chichester. Following the long straight path known as ‘Stane Street’ should be easy as it heads through Eartham Woods.  Look out for deer as they are often spotted leaping amongst the beech trees of these woods. 

Continue on path until the Six-Ways signpost is reached and where many paths converge. This sign is known locally as ‘Shippams Poste’, named after a local family who donated it. From here take the 1st path on the right that is signed towards Slindon (be careful not to take the firebreak). This long straight path passes through woodland known as North Wood. North Wood was once a large area of ancient woodland, but during both the 1st & 2nd world wars a huge demand on timber meant that many beech trees were felled to support the war effort. The fields were then ploughed and farmed to support British food production. By taking the opportunity of a short detour here through the gate and into National Trust reserve you’ll be able to see where 75 hectares of the arable farmland are being turned back into woodland. A massive project by the trust to recreate the special landscape and encourage much wildlife to return.

Head west, through Nore Wood and up to the 18th century Folly which was used by the Countess of Newburgh for many picnic parties. Take a moment here to catch your breath and admire the fine views across Sussex and on to Hampshire.

Leave the Folly heading towards Puck Lane Coppice, then take the westerly path back to Eartham.  On this path can be seen the brick and flint octagonal pump house that once supplied the nearby great house. This path leads into Eartham and a short walk along the road back to the start. Before leaving however, Why not take the opportunity to refuel at the local pub.

Chichester Roman Walls Walk

A 5.5 km (3.4 mile) circular walk along the Roman Walls that surround Chichester. Starting at the canal basin the walk heads to South Street where the official walls walk can be picked up, brass plagues inlaid into the pavement will indicate the way and many information boards on the walk explain more about the history.

City gates would once have stood at the four entrances of North, South, East and West Streets, but unfortunately no trace of these gates remain. Continue on South Street to the Old Theatre (now Zizzi’s) which was built in 1791 for the population of Chichester, turn into Theatre Lane and walk to the car park opposite where the first glimpse of the Roman Walls can be seen. Now a scheduled monument, more than 80% of the original structure has withstood the test of time and the majority of the walls are accessible to the public.

The South East Quadrant walls are found in a small park behind iron fencing and has a great example of one of only four remaining bastions. Standing at half its original height it was used as defences for the city, these bastions would have housed large crossbows capable of firing bolts up to 500m.

Exit park and continue through the car park into St John’s Street where St Johns Church chapel can be found, a rare example of a Georgian Proprietary Chapel, built in 1813 the chapel would have provided additional capacity for the existing parish churches meeting the spiritual needs of the growing urban population. 

Cross East Street and look for the silver wishbone hanging below the clock above the old entrance to the Shippam’s paste factory. Shippam’s have been in the city since 1750 when Sergeant Shipston Shippam opened a small warehouse in West Street selling butter, cheese and meat from the west country. Shippam’s also provided provisions for the Royal Navy during the Napoleonic wars. The meat paste factory in Eastgate opened in 1892 and prided itself on sourcing ingredients from all over the world to make into its famous pastes, production continued until 2002 when the factory was taken over by Princes and moved to Terminus Road. The smell of chicken stock was often smelt across the city and the silver wishbone above the door symbolises the great pile of wishbones left from the many carcasses that came in every day, they would have been given to visitors of the factory to take away as good luck tokens.

From the factory head north and stroll along the wide promenade created on the wall to Priory Park. Enter the Park and continue round the elevated walkway on the walls, that give a grand view over the park. Priory park has two additional scheduled monuments; the Guildhall that opened in 1292 as a Franciscan Friary and used by the Greyfriars that were resident in the park for over two centuries. The second monument is the Norman Motte where once stood Chichester Castle, built by local Lord Roger de Montgomerie. Also look out for the remains of the hospitum walls of the friary and the aviary that houses many budgerigars. 

The North East Quadrant of the walls finish as they lead into Priory Lane and the North West quadrant starts after crossing North Street. Another elevated section that continues around the city outskirts overlooking the houses of Orchard Street and giving some great views in places towards the cathedral.

After crossing West Street, the South West Quadrant is the last section of wall and this part has no promenade on the wall so is followed by a path alongside, take time to visit a hidden gem that is Bishops Palace Gardens, the peaceful gardens are situated just through a gap in the wall and next to the cathedral. Return to the walk which leaves the wall just past the gardens and follows the course of the River Lavant back to South Street, a short back track down Southgate will lead back to the start at the canal basin.  

Ancient Trees and Deers

A 6.5 km (4 miles)
A circular walk through the beautiful Petworth Park. A great time to visit is in the autumn when the leaves are changing colours and England’s largest collection of fallow deer can be heard rutting.
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The trek starts in the car park (furthest north from the house) and sets out in a westerly direction on the path leading out of the woods and into the rolling terrain of the park. Much of the park’s landscape has been laid out by Lancelot ‘Capability’ Brown, in particular the ponds and the strategically planting of many of the trees.
Cross over the spring that supplies water to the upper and lower ponds via several miles of underground drains and tunnels and continue past Shepherds Lodge, heading up the hill to Upperton Tower. The tower, also known as ‘The Monument’ was built in 1816 at a point where the main house could just be seen. Although referred to as ‘The Monument’ it does not commemorate anything and there is very little history on this building. It sits at 125m, the highest point in the park and has some terrific views to the Sussex countryside beyond.
Admiring the views retrace your steps and follow the contours around a natural bowl in the landscape to a steep decent down to the stony track. Many of the fallow deer can be seen much closer here as it tends to be a quieter part of the park. Follow the path south which gradually rises and on reaching the top Tillington Church Tower can be seen in the distance and the Upper Pond will also come into view. Head towards the pond taking the grassy path down to the waters edge.
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The Upper Pond was redesigned between 1752 – 1756 and to create the pond Capability Brown built a dam across the valley. The upper pond was captured by Turner in one of his pictures called ‘Dewy Morning’. As you descend it is clearly seen that the pond is designed to simulate a river flowing through the landscape.
Follow the iron fence around the pond to the unusual boathouse (also built by Brown in 1756), on top of the boathouse is a platform where views across the pond, it’s wildfowl and sussex countryside can be seen, look over the edge to see a ‘Neptune head’ sculpture embedded into the wall above the arches that was taken from the house.
Head away from the Upper Pond on the Lawns toward the house with it’s air of grandeur and prominence on the landscape. The wrought Iron gates lead to the ‘Pleasure Grounds’, designed to inspire a range of emotions, take some time here to discover the Doric temple, Ionic Rotunda and war memorial.
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Petworth House was built in 1682 and for an additional fee the house can be entered to see the many state rooms including paintings by well known artists.
Once back in the park, follow the wall that borders the pleasure grounds and here can be seen the oldest oak in the park at 940 years old. Some recent archaeology has revealed what is thought to be the remains of Henry VIII banqueting or hunting lodge in the area just before the descent to Lower Pond.
Just past the pond was once the site of an army camp for American and Canadian airman. Post war it was used as a resettlement camp for displaced Polish families up until 1959. There is no evidence left of the camp and the entrances in the wall have long been filled in.
On the last stretch back to the car park look out for the ‘Beelzebub Oak’ which dates back to 1779 and marks the parish boundary, the name derives from a superstition that ‘beyond the parish boundary the land was spiritually suspect’.

Highway Men & Medieval Heights

October 2018

This months trek is a circular walk of 14km (9 miles) from Arundel Bridge to the top of Barpham Hill and back taking in some fine views along the route. This trek is inspired by a DofE expedition that I recently assessed.Starting at Arundel Bridge head east along the river passing the Lido, which has been popular with locals since 1960. The 16th Duke of Norfolk donated the land in celebration of his daughter, Lady Anne’s 21st Birthday. After a period of closure and refurbishment the Lido is back open and now run as a charity. Continue along the raised river bank further out of the town and into the open farmland, following the river that was once ‘London’s Lost Route To The Sea’.At Warningcamp the railway meets the river and at this point there would once have been a wharf supplying local trade to the villages. Carefully cross the railway and follow the Monarchs Way through the sleepy hamlet, along the road and then into the woods that leads through a valley of Warningcamp Hill.

The path will start to rise and after a short steep incline will bring you up to Gibbets Piece, named after the gibbeting of Jack Upperton. A post has been placed as a memorial to the Wepham resident who was executed in Horsham in 1771. Jack was a poor labourer and in his 60s when he and an accomplice robbed the local postman, who was carrying mail to Arundel along the old Lewes to Chichester highway. Although only a pound was netted in the robbery, Jack was caught by locals that noticed his increased spending. Following his execution Jacks tarred body was placed in the gibbet as an example to others and to also ward off similar crimes. This old highway has long been downgraded to a bridleway and forms part of the Monarchs Way. It leads into and is surrounded by the woods of Angmering Park when in the spring blooms into mists of blue with many bluebells on the forest floor.


Follow this old highway through the mixed woods of Angmering Park, at the clearing head north leaving the Monarchs Way and ascend to the triangulation point at the top of Barpham Hill some 142m above sea level. On a good day terrific views can be had here reaching far along the coast and the Rampion wind farm is clearly seen standing prominently out to sea. Barpham itself now only consists of two farms but in 12c there was a church and village near Upper Barpham Farm, however in 1348 the black death swept through the village and many locals were buried in the vicinity. The church no longer exists and only small traces of it can be found today. Many sheep dominate the hills now.


Descend from the top of Barpham Hill and pick up the steep path down the side of Perry Hill to Coombe Lane and into Burpham. This path is part of an old medieval route known as the ‘Lepers Way’ that linked an old leper colony at Lee Farm with the church of St Mary in Burpham. There is a window that still exists today known as the lepers window through which the poor victims of this disease could view the service and be blessed by the priest inside the church.

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Opposite the church is The George pub built in 1738 and a great opportunity for some refreshment. From the pub head across the village green and down ‘Jacobs Ladder’ once part of a saxon fort that defended the village from the vikings and later was used by smugglers when coming from the river to the pub with their brandy and silks.
The base of the steps meet up with the River Arun which leads to an easy route back through Warningcamp to Arundel Bridge to complete the trek.