From Sea to Source

A trek following the Aldingbourne and Lidsey Rife from the sea to where they start.

So here we are in this lockdown again and need to stay at home with exception to do our local daily exercise. I am beginning to run out of local paths to walk and continuing to look for new adventures and less crowded places.

Being inspired by Simon Reeve after his 2019 tour, he said that there is always an adventure to be discovered and that we should go out there and do something new, like trace a river to it’s source, so that’s what I thought I would do.

The Aldingbourne Rife and Lidsey Rife amalgamate near Glenwood and run through Felpham to the sea, but where does it originate? The easier watercourse to follow is the Lidsey Rife, so this walk takes us inland to where it starts.

This walk is a 9km route from Felpham beach that follows the Lidsey Rife to its source. The Rife meets the sea through a sluice just west of the Felpham SSSI, a 1 hectare site of coastline which is one of only three sites in Britain to have fossils of flora dating back 66 million years to Paleocene period. Sea defenses have been constructed at the mouth of the river since the 15th Century and been rebuilt many times over the years after being breached by the sea.

The lower part of the rife can be tracked north through Longbrook Park and in 680AD this part was called ‘Brynes Fleot’ and would have curved through the site that is now Butlins. In 1953 during the construction of Butlins the Rife was straightened and can be picked up again by following the perimeter of the holiday resort.

The rife provides a natural border to the west of Felpham and winds its way from here through fields between Glenwood and the school. At this point the river splits and one section heads towards Shripney known as the Aldingbourne Rife, whereas the Lidsey Rife continues to the golf course and beyond.

The river can be followed through fields that i call ‘Woodpecker Meadows’ as you can usually see a woodpecker or two flying around here. The other side of the rife can be seen the former LEC airfield which is now home to the Bognor Regis Gliding Club. The airfield dates back to 1943 when it is believed that flying commenced from what was a farmers field, however it became known as LEC airfield after 1946 when Charles Purley started his refrigeration business alongside. The company had it’s own aircraft and would use them to fly across Europe to other factories.

The route now deviates a little from the rife as the public footpath that goes through the golf course does not directly follow the river. Follow the public footpath through the golf course, look out for the many rabbits that have their burrows on the path and rejoin the river further up. Continue on footpath out of the golf course and keep left to head under the viaduct and continue following river north. Look out for Heron and Little Egrets that all nest nearby, in the winter months these fields are known to flood, so be sure to wear wellies if we have had a lot of rain.

The Barnham cycle path runs parallel to the river as it begins to narrow and many tributaries can be seen leading into the river including the Ryebank Rife by the Bilsham solar farm. Keep a close eye out as roe deer can often be seen in the surrounding fields, sometimes hiding amongst the tall grasses.

The cycle path turns ninety degrees to the north and the rife continues through agricultural fields looking out over the field the course of the rife can be made out as it further decreases in size. Follow the cycle path until it meets the old Arundel to Portsmouth Canal and then head east following the route of the canal. The rife is rejoined at its source where it can clearly be seen as a pipe emerging from under the path of the old canal near to Tile Barn Farm.

The rife from here can be tracked back a short way and is a mere ditch with a small trickle of water in during the winter and dry during the summer. After crossing the last two bridges on the Lidsey rife the footpath heads back towards Bilsham and then Flansham.

Many tributaries can be seen and the route back also crosses the Ryebank Rife too, which winds its way through Elmer towards Climping.

The route is completed by heading back to Felpham by whichever way you choose.

One comment

  1. Martin Burch · May 14

    G’day Simon
    Great to read the info you provide on the local area.
    This brings back great memories from the past…..we used to be mates living around the corner from each other. I’ve been living in Queensland for 20 years and have not been back to the UK but trawling the internet found your website which has some pretty good info on the old haunts but updated. Hope Sue is keeping well. Please email me then we can perhaps catch up on the old days.
    Cheers
    Martin Burch (ex-links Avenue) now Queensland

    Like

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